Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Asian/Asian-American’ Category

Mochizuki, K. (1997). Passage to freedom: The sugihara story. New York, NY: Lee & Low Books, Inc.
Mochizuki tells this incredibly moving story in a simple style which enhances its impact.  Mr. Sugihara endangered himself and his family to ensure the safety of thousands of Jewish refugees during WWII.  The Afterword by Mr. Sugihara’s son, Hiroki, will bring tears to your eyes.

My grade:  A+

Read Full Post »

Young, E. (2006). My mei mei. New York, NY: The Penguin Group.
Young tells the story of two adopted sister from the point of view of the Jieh-Jieh (big sister).  She struggles to reconcile her thougths about what a Mei Mei (younger sister) should be and the reality of an actual younger sister.

My grade:  A+
I see this story appealing to any number of children and it’s just very sweet.

Read Full Post »

Ernst, J. (1995). The golden goose king: A tale told by Buddha. Chapel Hill: Parvadigar Press.
Buddha narrates this story of his life as the king of golden geese.  Through his capture and the loyalty displayed by his commander, Buddha (as the goose king) inspires the king and queen of Benares.  The book contains a detailed foreword by Carl Ernst, a professor of religious studies at UNC Chapel Hill, which gives more information about the origin of the story.

My grade:  B-
The grade is only from the wordiness of this story.

Read Full Post »

Park, L. S. (2001). A single shard. New York, NY: Random House, Inc.
Life isn’t easy for an orphan named Tree-ear in this historical fiction set in Korea, but he’s happy with his protector, Crane-man.  Tree-ear is fascinated by the work of Min, the greatest potter in the village.  Fate gives Tree-ear the opportunity to realize his dream of creating his own pottery.  Park‘s novel also contains much information about the making of celadon, a type of glazed stoneware.

My grade:  B+

Read Full Post »

Perkins, M. (1993). The not-so-star-spangled life of Sunita Sen. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company.
Being a teenager is hard enough, but Sunita Sen’s life gets even more difficult when her grandparents come to America from India to visit.  Not only can her guy friend, Michael, not hang out at her house, but her mom ditches American clothes for more traditional Indian garb.  Perkins explores Sunita’s conflict between her American life and Indian heritage throughout this novel.

My grade:  B+

Read Full Post »